Author Topic: A bit more history  (Read 1789 times)

Claire E

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A bit more history
« on: November 19, 2013, 10:53:34 PM »
Found this whilst browsing and thought it might be of interest...

Archaeological and historical background
2.2.1 Prehistoric activity has been detected within the area of Diglis Basin in the form of artefacts recovered during river dredging. These artefacts include a Bronze Age sword recovered below Diglis in 1902 and a Bronze Age flint digger found in dredged material dumped near Diglis Dock in 1956.
2.2.2 The Roman settlement of Worcester lies approximately 350m to the north of the site, which was first discovered when the castle motte was removed in 1833. The majority of the Roman activity would appear to be industrial in nature, and the rivers and its edges would have played an important role during this period. It has been suggested that a Roman harbour lies within the site, located close to the mouth of the Frog Brook. This assertion is based on the results of discoveries made during excavation of the river in the mid-19th century. The remains were found at depth, between +4 m and +6m OD. However, likely variations in the local topography indicated that the level at which any remains could occur was not predictable. Analysis of pollen samples from two test pits excavated in 1993 suggests that Roman deposits may be more widely distributed across the development site. The DBA concluded that there was limited evidence for the actual presence of a Roman harbour. The Roman road from Worcester to Gloucester is thought to have passed through the development site, in the area of the link road to the rear of Berwick Street.
2.2.3 No medieval remains are recorded from the site, though the floodplain would probably have been used during this period. A hermitage dedicated to St. Ursula is recorded from the general area of Diglis, although it?s exact location is unknown. The name Diglis first occurs in the records as the place name ?Dudleg? in 1232. The low- lying floodplain area is likely to have comprised marshland pasture in the early medieval period. In 1535 Diglis formed part of the Bishop of Worcester?s demesne, and the Prior of Worcester took a rent of ?6 from pastureland.
2.2.4 Historical sources suggest the presence of a mill (the Frog Mill) to the northeast of site along the banks of the Frog Brook in the Fifteenth century. There is also evidence to suggest that the brook was dammed and diverted for Worcester castle leat roughly at the same time. The mill is known to have continued in use into the seventeenth century. It was still operational in 1678, but by 1660 the mill pound had silted up.
2.2.5 In 1815 the Frog Brook was canalised into the Birmingham and Worcester Canal. The arrival of the canal meant that the area experienced rapid development, with industrial activity and porcelain production becoming established in the area.

christopher

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Re: A bit more history
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2013, 08:56:11 AM »
Very interesting. I wonder where the artefacts are, perhaps on display at the Museum?

Admin

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Re: A bit more history
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2013, 03:15:37 PM »
I've just come across the following. It's a P.D.F format, page 6 paragraph 2.2.3.

'The name Diglis first occurs in the records as the place name ?Dudleg? in 1232.'

Quote
Oxford Archaeology Diglis Basin, Diglis Dock Road, Worcester
Geoarchaeological Assessment Report
? Oxford Archaeological Unit Ltd. July 2006 4
2.2 Archaeological and historical background

2.2.1 Prehistoric activity has been detected within the area of Diglis Basin in the form of
artefacts recovered during river dredging. These artefacts include a Bronze Age
sword recovered below Diglis in 1902 and a Bronze Age flint digger found in
dredged material dumped near Diglis Dock in 1956.

2.2.2 The Roman settlement of Worcester lies approximately 350m to the north of the site,
which was first discovered when the castle motte was removed in 1833. The majority
of the Roman activity would appear to be industrial in nature, and the rivers and its
edges would have played an important role during this period. It has been suggested
that a Roman harbour lies within the site, located close to the mouth of the Frog
Brook. This assertion is based on the results of discoveries made during excavation of
the river in the mid-19th century. The remains were found at depth, between +4 m
and +6m OD. However, likely variations in the local topography indicated that the
level at which any remains could occur was not predictable. Analysis of pollen
samples from two test pits excavated in 1993 suggests that Roman deposits may be
more widely distributed across the development site. The DBA concluded that there
was limited evidence for the actual presence of a Roman harbour. The Roman road
from Worcester to Gloucester is thought to have passed through the development site,
in the area of the link road to the rear of Berwick Street.

2.2.3 No medieval remains are recorded from the site, though the floodplain would
probably have been used during this period. A hermitage dedicated to St. Ursula is
recorded from the general area of Diglis, although it?s exact location is unknown. The
name Diglis first occurs in the records as the place name?Dudleg? in 1232.
The lowlying floodplain area is likely to have comprised marshland pasture in the early
medieval period. In 1535 Diglis formed part of the Bishop of Worcester?s demesne,
and the Prior of Worcester took a rent of ?6 from pastureland.

2.2.4 Historical sources suggest the presence of a mill (the Frog Mill) to the northeast of
site along the banks of the Frog Brook in the Fifteenth century. There is also evidence
to suggest that the brook was dammed and diverted for Worcester castle leat roughly
at the same time. The mill is known to have continued in use into the seventeenth
century. It was still operational in 1678, but by 1660 the mill pound had silted up.

2.2.5 In 1815 the Frog Brook was canalised into the Birmingham and Worcester Canal.
The arrival of the canal meant that the area experienced rapid development, with
industrial activity and porcelain production becoming established in the area.

jaybee

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Re: A bit more history
« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2013, 04:37:32 PM »
The single storey building with the rounded windows on Diglis River Lock island,and used until recent years as workshops,was in fact built as a chapel of rest for the navvies killed during the construction of the canal.