Author Topic: Tree Diseases  (Read 1416 times)

Admin

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Tree Diseases
« on: January 07, 2013, 05:42:07 PM »
Had a word with Trevor (Wildlife Ranger) today concerning Ash die back on the Cherry Orchard Nature Reserve. They are not aware of any at the moment but he did say that when the tree's start to come into leaf they will be able to see if they have been affected.

He also mentioned that there are a some trees that have got:
 'Acute Oak Decline'
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Acute oak decline is thought to be around 20-30 years old and affects mature English and sessile oak trees of at least 50 years old.

Symptoms

Black weeping patches on stems (called stem bleeds)
Lesions and necrotic tissue underlying the bleed points
Larvae can weave a path between the inner wood and outer bark
Causes

Thought to be bacterial, but the wood boring buprestid beetle may be partly to blame
Prognosis

Some affected trees die within 4-5 years of developing symptoms
Canopy health seems fine in early stages but grows visibly thinner as trees approach death

'Sudden Oak Death':

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Sudden Oak death is caused by the fungus Phytophthora ramorum ? a primitive, but effective, parasitic fungus.  The term sudden oak death is somewhat misleading in that the fungus attacks many types of tree including larch, horse chestnut, sweet chestnut, ash and also shrubs such as Viburnum, Camellia and Rhododendron. It has also been found on heathland plants such as bilberry  (Vaccinium myrtillus).

Such a shame really but it seems that nothing can be done!  :(

WildlifeRanger

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Re: Tree Diseases
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2013, 09:06:03 AM »
Just to clarify - we haven't spotted any symptoms of Acute Oak Decline on Cherry Orchard - but we do have affected oak trees in Warndon Wood.

We aren't aware of any trees suffering from Sudden Oak Death in Worcester, but it's worth keeping an eye out for symptoms.

From The Forestry Commission Website, regarding Ash Dieback:

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Advice to forest visitors
The risk of visitors spreading the disease is very small and we are not closing forests or advising owners of infected sites to do so.

We do ask that if you are visiting an infected or suspected wood, please take some simple precautions:

?do not remove any plant material (firewood, sticks, leaves or cuttings) from the woodland;
?where possible, before leaving the woodland, clean soil, mud, leaves and other plant material from footwear, clothing, dogs, horses, the wheels and tyres of bicycles, baby buggies, carriages and other vehicles, and remove any leaves which are sticking to your car;
?before visiting other countryside sites, parks, garden centres and nurseries, thoroughly wash footwear, wheels and tyres in soapy water;
?follow the instructions on any signs.
If you are unsure whether a wood is infected, or suspected of being infected, it is always good practice to follow the advice above.


Of course, these measures help prevent spread of all these diseases!
 
Heather (Assistant Ranger)

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Re: Tree Diseases
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2013, 12:21:46 AM »
Just to clarify - we haven't spotted any symptoms of Acute Oak Decline on Cherry Orchard - but we do have affected oak trees in Warndon Wood.

We aren't aware of any trees suffering from Sudden Oak Death in Worcester, but it's worth keeping an eye out for symptoms.

I do apologise for my mistake. I misunderstood what was said to me.

However, it's given us all something to watch out for when we are in the Cherry Orchard Nature Reserve.